Two First Temple period seals found in Jerusalem

It has been reported that two seals have been found in the Givati Parking Lot excavations, bearing the names of a man and a woman, respectively “Sa‘aryahu ben Shabenyahu” and “Elihana bat Gael”. Their names are not mentioned in the Bible.

Seal of Sa‘aryahu ben Shabenyahu

Seal of Elihana bat Gael

Seals with names of women are pretty rare, so she must have been an influential person.  The excavators date the finds to about 2,600 years ago, but, we would agree with Todd Bolen, who suspects that the date is closer to 700-600 BC, i.e. the end of the First Temple period.

According to archaeologists, Dr. Doron Ben-Ami, Yana Tchekhanovets and Salome Cohen, excavation directors on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, explain, “Personal seals, such as those of Elihana and Sa‘aryahu, were used for signing documents, and were frequently inlaid as part of a ring that was worn by the owner. In antiquity they designated the identity, genealogy and status of the owner of the seal”.

On the rare woman’s seal, which is made of semi-precious stone, appears the mirror-writing of “to Elihana bat Gael”, inscribed in ancient Hebrew letters. The female owner of the ring is mentioned here together with the name of her father.

According to Dr. Hagai Misgav of Hebrew University in Jerusalem, “Seals that belonged to women represent just a very small proportion of all the seals that have been discovered to date. This is because of the generally inferior economic status of women, apart from extraordinary instances such as this. Indeed, the name Elihana does not appear in the Bible, and there is no other information regarding the identity of the woman, but the fact that she possessed a seal demonstrates her high social status”. Dr. Misgav adds, “Most of the women’s seal that are known to us bear the name of the father rather than that of the husband.

These excavations claimed earlier to have found the remains of the Akra Fortress, which, however, may have belonged to the city’s fortification walls and not to the Fortress by the same name.

HT: Joe Lauer

This entry was posted in Excavations, Jerusalem. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Two First Temple period seals found in Jerusalem

  1. Wesley says:

    Dr. Ritmeyer,

    Wouldn’t 2600 years ago be roughly around 700-600 BC?

    Wesley

  2. Wesley,
    That is about right. Therefore the seals came from a First Temple period context and were not post-Exilic.

  3. Pete Boon says:

    Dear Leen,

    Is the name on this seal similar to the name of the servant of Uzziah on display in the Louvre? (Belonging to Shebnayau, servant of Uzziah exhibit AO-2616)

  4. Hi Pete,
    Yes, as far as I can tell the name of Shebnayau appears to be the same.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.