The Ark of the Covenant

With the conversion of our slide set, “From Sinai to Sakhra,” into digital format, the complete set of volumes we previously had available is now on disc. Having ourselves followed, in part, the route of the Ark and being intimately familiar with some of its resting-places, this subject is close to our hearts. Information that has come to light in recent years has been added, making this CD an entirely new presentation.


Pictures of a model of the Tabernacle, designed by Dr. Leen Ritmeyer, have been included to help viewers understand the place of the Ark in the symbolism of God’s desert sanctuary. Specially created maps of its journey to the Promised Land and wanderings among the Philistines make it possible to follow this dramatic story. There are unique reconstruction drawings of scenes such as the Camp of Israel at the foot of Mount Sinai and evocative photographs of the desert scenes through which the Ark passed. The view of Moses from Mount Nebo is contrasted with that of Balaam, the mad prophet, from the very same spot. A rare photograph of the River Jordan in flood serves to demonstrate the faith of the two spies who crossed it before the Ark could lead the Israelites into their inheritance.

Reconstruction drawing of the Camp of Israel at the foot of Mount Sinai - © Leen Ritmeyer


Excavation photographs and diagrams show that the walls of Jericho really did fall down! Once Jerusalem is reached, the cities of David and Solomon, which were so closely involved with the Ark’s stay, are explored both in photographs and graphics. The account of the travels of the Ark ends with the installation of this holiest of objects in the Holy of Holies of the Temple and a discussion as to its possible location today.

We have ideas for exciting new topics for CDs to aid you in your Bible study and teaching and will keep you posted on this blog. Do let us know if there is a subject you would like covered.

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17 Responses to The Ark of the Covenant

  1. Benjamin D. Williams says:

    The reconstruction of the Israelites at Sinai in the Glo Bible program is fantastic. I observe similarities with that picture posted above.

  2. If you read the Bible you are bound to come to similar conclusions. BTW, I was the consultant on History, Bible and Archaeology for GLO Digital Bible Project. The drawing you mentioned is now available as one of our Bible Charts and should be helpful when you read about or teach this subject: http://www.ritmeyer.com/online-store/bible-charts/the-camp-of-israel-at-mount-sinai/

  3. Pingback: How could my class and I dress up as like a priest or prophet in the Old Testament? | dress up girls

  4. STEPHANIE MACALLISTER says:

    i am interested in the holiest of holies in Herod’s temple. do you have a diagram of the stone that was used by the high priest replacing the ark of the covenant? was it the bed rock that the temple on which the temple was built?

    stephanie macallister

  5. Stephanie,
    There was no separate stone in the Holy of Holies. The High Priest put the incense in the receptacle where the Ark once stood. See these pictures from our Image Library: http://store.ritmeyer.com/node/237 and http://store.ritmeyer.com/node/15 and http://store.ritmeyer.com/node/216 and http://store.ritmeyer.com/node/213.
    Inside the Dome of the Rock the top of Mount Moriah can be seen and the Temple was built directly on The Rock.

  6. Gordon Stamper says:

    The picture of the ark with angels is totally wrong! Please read the scriptures and note the cherub were 10 cubits high and had 10 cubit wing spans. They touched each other in the middle and each cherub touched the wall on either side. Thus the angels had to be standing beside the ark of the covenant which was small in comparison to their size. When the cherub outstreched their wings they were 20 cubits or about 30 feet wide and reached from the north wall to the south wall plus covered the ark.

  7. Sorry, Gordon, but my reconstruction of the Ark of the Covenant is absolutely correct. The picture on the cover of our CD Vol. 3 (http://www.ritmeyer.com/online-store/cds/volume-3-the-ark-of-the-covenant/) shows the Ark as it was made in Sinai and described in Ex. 25.10-22. This Ark measured 2.5 cubits long and 1.5 cubits high and wide.
    You refer to the two large cherubim that were placed in Solomon’s Temple over the Ark of the Covenant, see 1 Kings 6.23-28. These cherubim were 10 cubits wide, but the two of them, being 20 cubits wide, would never fit in the Tabernacle as that was only 10 cubits wide!
    So, I believe that it is you that need to read the Scriptures more carefully.

  8. Thomas Manz says:

    In doing 3D reconstruction of the Ark, have you looked into its weight? When in Bible school, I did a paper (now lost) on the materials of the Ark, its estimated weight, and the priest-power needed to lift and move it. It appears to have been an extremely heavy object.

  9. DENZIL FERNANDES UAE says:

    whats the content of the ark supposed to be

  10. Denzil: The two tablets with the ten commandments (Deut. 10.5), the golden pot that contained manna and Aaron’s rod that budded (Hebrews 9.4).

  11. kyle kopitke says:

    Hi Leen,

    Great website; very interesting.

    Any thoughts on what a “Cherubim” was? Some believe that it was an animal. That Angels do not have wings. The reason I am asking is because I am making a low budget Indie movie about a related subject which will feature an AOTC. SO I am trying to get it close as possible. The design of the Cherubim is a big question.

    I would be grateful if you would reply to my email address.

    Thanks and God Bless,
    Kyle

  12. Dilip says:

    A relative newcomer but I do believe in the “ARK”
    It could not just have vanished from the face of earth – there is no reaction without an action. Yes I am a scientist and I do believe there is more to it than science in this world.
    Dr. Len I would appreciate it if we can be in personal touch – it’s not about finding just the ARK but knowing the truth the fact … May be I sound weird but that’s me .. I am that kind of a person that wants to search …

  13. Dilip,

    Wouldn’t we all like to know more about the Ark! I have written about my findings in my book The Quest: http://www.ritmeyer.com/online-store/books/the-quest-revealing-the-temple-mount-in-jerusalem/ pp. 268-277; 308-311.

  14. Colin says:

    hi Leen – I’ve just belatedly seen your exchange of June 2011, above. Is there perhaps another possible solution on how the size of the cherubim wings and the size of the Holy of Holies in Solomon’s temple can be reconciled? What I have in mind is this: Mettinger on pages 21-23 of ‘The Dethronement of Sabaoth” (1982) takes the wings to form the throne-seat as a wrap-round, the inner wings meeting horizontally at the back of the seat while the outer wings point upwards. He is assuming that it is similar in shape to ancient reliefs that picture cherubim-like thrones, dating from the late second millennium BC. Has this played a part in your considerations already?

    best wishes

    Colin

  15. Colin,
    I am not familiar with this view.

  16. Colin says:

    Leen, would you like me to send a copy of those three pages – illustrations of the archaeology – from Mettinger to you? To what address?

  17. Colin says:

    Easier than that – one of the three illustrations adorns the cover of another of Mettinger’s books, and you can see it on Amazon:
    http://www.amazon.com/In-Search-God-Everlasting-ebook/dp/B001PGXOVK/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1369994385&sr=1-1
    It is not an illustration of the Temple throne, but Mettinger suggests it may be analogous. It is the outer wing that you see pointing upwards – the inner wing forming the back of the throne is obscured from view in this illustration.

    Colin

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